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    Eighth Sunday after Trinity (August 11, 2019)

    Our processional hymn, “Now that the daylight fills the skies,” is sometimes attributed to St. Ambrose. Our Hymnal (probably more accurately) regards it as an anonymous hymn from the sixth century. Around that time, the text began to be chanted during the Office of Prime, the first daylight hour of the Divine Office. The translation in our Hymnal is by the Anglican priest John Mason Neale (1818-1866). There are two tunes available for this hymn in our Hymnal, and the tune we usually sing is HERR JESU CHRIST, first published in a Lutheran hymnal in 1648. J. S. Bach used this tune in several chorales preludes, a few of which…

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    Seventh Sunday after Trinity (August 4, 2019)

    The Collect for today begins with an affirmation of God’s power and might: Lord of all power and might, who art the author and giver of all good things: graft in our hearts the love of thy Name, increase in us true religion; nourish us with all goodness, and of thy great mercy keep us in the same; through Jesus Christ our Lord. AMEN. God’s power and might are much in view in the text of our opening hymn, “Give praise and glory unto God” (#287). Throughout the hymn, divine power is portrayed as merciful and protective: God’s might is not a display of sheer unlimited will, but the agency…

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    Sixth Sunday after Trinity (July 28, 2019)

    We are all eagerly awaiting Wallace Hornady’s return next week. Meanwhile, the hymns we’ll sing a cappella this Sunday are all discussed on separate pages linked with the titles below: O day of rest and gladness (#474)Majestic sweetness sits enthroned (#353)Sion, praise thy Saviour (#193, WEMAN)Very Bread, good Shepherd (#194, UNITAS FRATRUM)The King of love my shepherd is (#345)Lord, dismiss us with thy blessing (#489, SICILIAN MARINERS)

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    Fifth Sunday after Trinity (July 21, 2019)

    The author of our opening hymn was identified simply as “K” when “How firm a foundation” was first published in 1787. The text’s remarkable popularity may account for the large number of tunes associated with it. In every previous edition of our Hymnal, a different tune was used. The tune appointed in this edition is LYONS, although in the Supplemental Tunes section in the back of the Hymnal, the more primitive and familiar FOUNDATION is available (and we sometimes sing it). Like many tunes based on folk melodies, FOUNDATION uses a pentatonic (five-note) scale, which means you can play it using just the black keys on the piano. (Try it,…

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    Fourth Sunday after Trinity (July 14, 2019)

    The Processional hymn for this Sunday — “Immortal, invisible, God only wise” — is based on I Timothy 1:17: “Now unto the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only wise God . . . ” The text is by Walter Chalmers Smith (1824-1908), a native of Aberdeen, Scotland, and a minister in the Free Church of Scotland. The tune ST. DENIO is one of the many traditional Welsh ballads which have been adapted to sustain vigorous hymn-singing. Each Sunday in the Creed, we affirm that Christ is “Light of Light.” In the Bible, the imagery of light is applied both to Christ and to the revelation we receive in Scripture. The first…

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    Third Sunday after Trinity (July 7, 2019)

    The Processional hymn for this Sunday is “O God, our help in ages past.” On the page devoted to this hymn, you may read the text of three additional stanzas that Isaac Watts originally included in the hymn, and learn about compositions by Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel, and Ralph Vaughan Williams that used its melody. The Sermon hymn, “Fairest Lord Jesus,” is sometimes claimed to be a 12th-century Crusader hymn. In fact, it is a translation of hymn from a 17th-century German Roman Catholic hymnal. The tune, ST. ELISABETH, dates to the 19th century, and is so named because of its use in The Legend of St. Elizabeth,…

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    Second Sunday after Trinity (June 30, 2019)

    Our Processional hymn — “When morning gilds the skies” — is a translation of an anonymous German hymn dating from the late eighteenth or early nineteenth century. It is one of many hymns describing the inescapability of song in the life of the believer. Worship, especially through music, is the fitting response to Jesus Christ not only by believers but — as the hymn’s final stanza declares — by all of Creation. In 1899, the poet laureate of Great Britain, Robert Bridges (1844-1930), translated this hymn for use in English-language hymnals. Other translations by Bridges in our Hymnal include “Ah, holy Jesus, how hast thou offended” (#71) and “O sacred head, sore…

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    First Sunday after Trinity (June 23, 2019)

    Which came first, the text or the music? With hymns, texts are often written first, then tunes selected because they capture the spirit of the text. But sometimes, the text of a hymn is written with a very specific tune in mind. Our Processional hymn — “All praise to thee, for thou, O King divine” — is a case in point, but as it happens, we are not singing the tune that the poet had in mind when he wrote these stanzas. The story of text and tune in this case is complex. Born in Norfolk and a graduate of the University of Virginia (1914), F. Bland Tucker (1895-1984) was…

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    Trinity Sunday (June 16, 2019)

    In the 1662 edition of the Book of Common Prayer, priests are instructed to substitute the Athanasian Creed for the Apostles Creed within the Morning Prayer liturgy on certain feast days. Trinity Sunday was one of those days. Given the fact that over half of the text is devoted to combatting heresies concerning the Trinity, its use on this day is most fitting. Here is the first section of that Creed: Whosoever will be saved, before all things it is necessary that he hold the catholic faith. Which faith unless every one do keep whole and undefiled, without doubt he shall perish everlastingly. And the catholic faith is this: that…

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    Pentecost, commonly called Whitsunday (June 9, 2019)

    The “pente-” in Pentecost refers to the 50 days since Easter. The “whit-” comes from the white garments worn by those baptized during vigil on the night before this feast day. The celebration of the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost has a particular relevance during times of heightened social division. At Pentecost, we learn that the often violent fragmentation of the human race (evident in the diversity of languages present when the mighty wind and tongues of fire suddenly appeared) can only be healed by God’s power. Peter Leithart has observed that secular programs and strategies to combat tribalism are destined to fail; the division of Babel and…