• Psalms,  Service music

    A Psalm for Lent

    During Lent, when weather permits, we will be chanting Psalm 51:1–13 as part of our parking lot hymn-sing. The Anglican chant setting we will be using is by Charles H. Wilton (1761–1832), an English violinist, singer, and music teacher. We have sung this setting as a parish in the past, and you may download a pdf of the text and music here. As part of our Choir in Quarantine project, our choir has made a recording of this Psalm setting for use by the parish.

  • Psalms,  Service music

    Quinquagesima

    PropersPsalms Propers         Introit Esto mihi. Psalm 31Be thou my God and defender, and a place of refuge that thou mayest save me: for thou art upholder, my refuge, and my Saviour: and for thy holy Name’s sake be thou my leader, and my sustainer. In thee, O Lord, have I put my trust; let me never be put to confusion: but rid me and deliver me in thy righteousness. Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Ghost. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be: world without end. Amen. Be thou my God . . .…

  • Psalms

    Psalm 37:25–41.
    Junior fui, etenim senui

    Plainchant setting The recording below is based on the Sarum Psalm tones as presented in the St. Dunstan’s Plainsong Psalter. It is chanted to Tone VII 9. Anglican chant setting of Psalm 37:1–41 The entire Psalm is sung here by the Choir of York Minster, directed by Philip Moore. The organist is John Scott Whiteley. Three different chant settings are employed, by Henry John Gauntlett (1805–1876), Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924), and Sydney Watson (1903-1991).

  • Psalms

    Psalm 37:12–24.
    Observabit peccator justum

    Plainchant setting The recording below is based on the Sarum Psalm tones as presented in the St. Dunstan’s Plainsong Psalter. It is chanted to Tone I A 5. Anglican chant setting of Psalm 37:1–41 The entire Psalm is sung here by the Choir of York Minster, directed by Philip Moore. The organist is John Scott Whiteley. Three different chant settings are employed, by Henry John Gauntlett (1805–1876), Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924), and Sydney Watson (1903-1991).