• Service music

    Second Sunday in Lent (March 17, 2019)

    The Epistle and Gospel readings for this Sunday present an exhortation toward sanctification and an account of a healing miracle. The Collect speaks of both themes, in asking that God would “keep us both outwardly in our bodies, and inwardly in our souls.” The Introit also echoes the idea of being kept from dangers by God with phrases from Psalm 25: “Let not our enemies triumph over us: deliver us, O God of Israel, out of all our troubles.” Our opening hymn — “Spread, O spread, thou mighty word” — is a call to convey the Gospel’s message of deliverance from sin and death, and of the possibility of holy…

  • Service music

    First Sunday in Lent (March 10, 2019)

    The Propers chanted by the choir on this first Sunday in Lent are dominated by verses taken from Psalm 91. It is rare for one biblical passage to be so prominent throughout the service, but this Sunday is exceptional. On this Sunday we enter a liturgical season in which Christ’s forty days in the wilderness (narrated in today’s Gospel reading) is remembered. That experience is marked preeminently by the Son’s faithfulness and trust in the Father’s protection, the theme of Psalm 91. Old Testament scholar Derek Kidner writes that Psalm 91 “is a psalm for danger: for times of exposure and encirclement or of challenging the power of evil.” As we…

  • Service music

    Ash Wednesday (March 6, 2019)

    Our hymns in the 6:30 PM Ash Wednesday service will be: “Forty days and forty nights” “My faith looks up to thee” “Strengthen for service, Lord, the hands” “Glory be to Jesus” “Lord, who throughout these forty days” The links will connect you to pages that provide some historical notes about each hymn, as well as a piano rendition of each. Our Sequence hymn throughout Lent is an Anglican chant setting of Psalm 51:1-13. You may listen to it here, and download a copy of the music. The Offertory anthem in this service is Miserere mei, Deus (“Have mercy on me, O God”), a setting of the first verse of…

  • Service music

    Quinquagesima (March 3, 2019)

    Love is a prominent theme in the prayers, readings, and songs for this Sunday. In our opening hymn, “My God, I love thee,” we reflect on the affirmation in I John 4:19, that we love God because he first loved us. As our hymn declares: “Not with the hope of gaining aught, nor seeking a reward, but as thyself hast loved me, O ever-loving Lord!” The Collect for the day is a prayer that we might be made more loving: O Lord, who hast taught us that all our doings without charity are nothing worth; Send thy Holy Ghost, and pour into our hearts that most excellent gift of charity, the…

  • Service music

    Sexagesima (February 24, 2019)

    A theme present in the opening hymn, the Introit, and the Collect for today is God’s defense and protection of his people. Our processional hymn is “We gather together.” In the final stanza of this hymn, we sing a prayer that God will continue to be our defender, and that we might escape tribulation. The Introit sung by the choir is known by its Latin name as Exsurge; quare obdormis Domine? The plea in this prayer is taken from Psalm 44: Arise, O Lord, wherefore sleepest thou? Awake, and cast us not away for ever: wherefore hidest thou thy countenance and forgettest our adversity and misery? Our belly cleaveth unto the…

  • Interviews,  Reading

    Recommended reading: Melodious order

    In his 1986 book Foolishness to the Greeks, Lesslie Newbigin argued that the central fact of modern culture is “the elimination of teleology.” If one had need of reducing the complex systemic confusions of modernity to a single phrase, he could do a lot worse. Modern culture — submitting abjectly and irrationally to the idol of Choice — cannot acknowledge the existence of purposes or ends in the cosmos that would direct or constrict our choosing. The genealogy of this idolatry is variously explained, but there is a rough consensus among scholars from various disciplines and diverse belief systems (including some who celebrate modernity) that the Enlightenment of the eighteenth…

  • Service music

    Septuagesima (February 17, 2019)

    This Sunday, we begin the pre-Lenten season, a period in which the structure of our liturgy changes. The name suggests that this Sunday is 70 days before Easter. Actually, it is only 63 days before Easter, but the name is still fitting, since the day falls within the 7th (septimus) decade or 10-day period (the 61st to the 70th day) before Easter. Our opening hymn — “Give praise and glory unto God” — presents 3 of the 9 verses of a hymn by Johann Jakob Schütz (1640-1690). First published in 1675, the German original has inspired at least 6 different English translations. In addition to the version in our Hymnal, there are translations…

  • Repertoire

    Saul on the Road to Damascus, Part 3

    The week before last, I introduced readers to Heinrich Schütz’s Saul, Saul, was verfolgst du mich? (SWV 415). This short work presents the moment when the words of Jesus come to Saul, the initial phase of his conversion. Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me? It will be hard for you to kick against the thorns. Calvin Stapert (whose books on various musical topics I often cite) wrote to share with me some comments on how Schütz constructed this short work. With Stapert’s permission, I’ve posted his comments below. First, here is another recording of Saul, Saul, was verfolgst du mich? featuring the Monteverdi Choir and the English Baroque Soloists, conducted…

  • Service music

    Fifth Sunday after Epiphany (February 10, 2019)

    This is the last Sunday before the pre-Lenten season, hence the last Sunday until Easter in which “Alleluias” will be heard in our liturgy. Our opening hymn — “Praise the Lord through every nation” — punctuates its praise in both verses with an enthusiastic Alleluia. It also boasts a wonderfully ecumenical genealogy. The tune to this hymn is best known as WACHET AUF, though for some reason is designated in English in our Hymnal as SLEEPERS, WAKE. We more typically sing this during Advent with the text “Wake, awake for night is flying.” It was written by Lutheran pastor Philip Nicolai (1556-1608). The text to the present hymn was written…

  • Service music

    Fourth Sunday after Epiphany (February 3, 2019)

    February 2nd marks the feast day known variously as Candlemas (sometimes spelled Candlemass), the Feast of the Presentation of Our Lord Jesus, and the Feast of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Our Book of Common Prayer (see the table page xliv) and Hymnal uses the latter term, which reflects the reason for Mary and Joseph’s presentation of their Son as prescribed in Leviticus 12. It is an event in the life of Jesus that has been depicted in countless paintings and icons. Musically, every setting of the Nunc dimittis — the song Simeon uttered on this occasion — commemorates this moment and its cosmic significance. Our service acknowledges the events remembered…