• Service music

    Eighth Sunday after Trinity

    PropersMotets and a cantataJohn Keble, “Eighth Sunday after Trinity”Christopher Wordsworth, Two hymns for the Eighth Sunday after Trinity [Psalm 34] O taste and see how gracious the Lord is: blessed is he that putteth his trust in him. Motets and a cantata Heinrich Isaac, Gustate et videteJohn Goss, O taste and seeRalph Vaughan Williams, O taste and seeJohann Sebastian Bach, Es ist dir gesagt, Mensch, was gut ist (BWV 45) Heinrich Isaac, Gustate et videte The Franco-Flemish composer Heinrich Isaac (c.1450-1517) was born at a time and place that boasted excellent music education. Isaac served as a court musician in Germany, Italy, Austria, and other parts of central Europe. The…

  • Service music

    Seventh Sunday after Trinity

    PropersFive motets based on today’s IntroitJohn Keble, “Seventh Sunday after Trinity”Christopher Wordsworth, Hymn for Seventh Sunday after Trinity [Psalm 31] Bow down thine ear: make haste to deliver us. Five motets based on today’s Introit Christopher Tye, Omnes gentes plaudite manibusGiovanni Gabrieli, Omnes gentes plaudite manibusOrlando Gibbons, O clap your handsRalph Vaughan Williams, O clap your handsPhilip Moore, O clap your hands Christopher Tye, Omnes gentes plaudite manibus Both the Introit and the Alleluia include the first verse of Psalm 47, which contains many references to the elements of music: clapping, singing, melody, a merry noise, and the sound of a trump(et). That proliferation of musical allusions may account for…

  • Service music

    Sixth Sunday after Trinity

    PropersTwo motets and a cantataJohn Keble, “Sixth Sunday after Trinity”Christopher Wordsworth, Hymn for Sixth Sunday after Trinity [Psalm 27] I will offer in his dwelling an oblation with great gladness: I will sing, and speak praises unto the Lord. Two motets and a cantata Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Perfice gressus meusOtto Albert Tichý, Perfice gressus meusJohann Sebastian Bach, Vergnügte Ruh, beliebte Seelenlust (BWV 170) Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Perfice gressus meus The text for today’s Offertory is from Psalm 17. The second half of this Psalm is dominated by calls for protection from enemies. The first half begins with a claim by the psalmist of a sincere and deliberate desire…

  • Service music

    Fifth Sunday after Trinity

    PropersA hymn, two motets, and a cantataJohn Keble, “Fifth Sunday after Trinity”Christopher Wordsworth, Hymn for Fifth Sunday after Trinity [Psalm 27] One thing have I desired of the Lord, which I will require : even that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life. A hymn, two motets, and a cantata “They cast their nets in Galilee”Lorenzo Perosi, Exaudi DominePietro Allori, Exaudi DomineJohann Sebastian Bach, Siehe, ich will viel Fischer aussenden “They cast their nets in Galilee” Attorney and poet from Greenville, Mississippi, William Alexander Percy (1885-1942) was a first cousin-once-removed of novelist and essayist Walker Percy (1916-1990), who once described “Uncle Will”…

  • Service music

    Fourth Sunday after Trinity

    PropersMotets and cantatasJohn Keble, “Fourth Sunday after Trinity”Christopher Wordsworth, Hymn for Fourth Sunday after Trinity [Psalm 18] The Lord is my stony rock, and my defence: my Saviour, my god, and my might. Motets and cantatas Alessandro Grandi, Illumina oculos meosOrlande de Lassus, Illumina oculos meosHenry Desmarets, Illumina oculos meosJohann Sebastian Bach, Ein ungefärbt Gemüte (BWV 24, “An unstained character”) Alessandro Grandi, Illumina oculos meos Today’s Offertory is a verse taken from Psalm 13. Here is that verse and several of the following verse which are often included in musical settings. Illumina oculos meos, ne unquam obdormiam in morte,Lighten mine eyes, that I sleep not in death.Ne quando dicat inimicus…

  • Service music

    Third Sunday after Trinity

    PropersMotets and cantatasJohn Keble, “Third Sunday after Trinity” [St. Luke 15] I say unto you: There is joy in the presence of the Angels of God over one sinner that repenteth. Motets and cantatas Lajos Bárdos, Sperent in te (“Let them trust in thee”)Johann Sebastian Bach, Ich hatte viel Bekümmernis (BWV 21, “My heart was deeply troubled”) Lajos Bárdos, Sperent in te A student of the celebrated teacher and composer Zoltán Kodály (1882–1967), Lajos Bárdos (1899–1986) was a significant figure in the development during the 20th century of Hungarian choral music. His setting of today’s Offertory, Sperent in te (“Let them trust in thee”), was composed in 1946. It is…

  • Service music

    The Second Sunday after Trinity

    PropersMotets and cantatasJohn Keble, “Second Sunday after Trinity” [Psalm 13] I will sing of the Lord, because he hath dealt so lovingly with me: yea, I will praise the Name of the Lord Most Highest. Motets and cantatas Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Ad Dominum cum tribularerOrlande de Lassus, Ad Dominum cum tribularerHans Leo Hassler, Ad Dominum cum tribularerHeinrich Schütz, Ad Dominum cum tribularerJ. S. Bach, Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes (BWV 76) Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Ad Dominum cum tribularer The Gradual for this Sunday is taken from the first two verses of Psalm 120. Many Latin-language settings of the text for this Gradual are designated as Ad Dominum…

  • Service music

    The First Sunday after Trinity

    PropersMotets and cantatasJohn Keble, “First Sunday after Trinity” [Psalm 9] I will speak of all thy marvellous works: I will be glad and rejoice in thee: yea, my songs will I make of thy Name, O thou Most Highest. Motets and cantatas Orlande de Lassus, Verba mea auribus percipe, DomineAndrea Gabrieli, Verba mea auribus, percipe, DomineHeinrich Schütz, Verba mea auribus percipe, DomineMaurizio Cazzati, Verba mea auribus percipe, DomineJohann Sebastian Bach, O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort Orlande de Lassus, Verba mea auribus percipe, Domine Andrea Gabrieli, Verba mea auribus, percipe, Domine The setting of this text by Lassus’s contemporary, Andrea Gabrieli (1532/1533–1585) is in two parts; the first part — which includes…

  • Psalms,  Service music

    Trinity Sunday

    Hymns for Trinity SundayPropersPsalms from the Daily OfficeMotets and cantatasJohn Keble, “Trinity Sunday” Hymns for Trinity Sunday “Holy, Holy, Holy! Lord God Almighty” (#266)“I bind unto myself today” (#268)“Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord” (#270) “Holy, Holy, Holy! Lord God Almighty” (#266) The processional hymns in our Trinity Sunday service is often “Holy, Holy, Holy! Lord God Almighty” (#266). It was written by Reginald Heber (1783-1826), a scholar (fellow of All Souls, Oxford), priest (rector of a parish in Shropshire for sixteen years), and bishop of Calcutta from 1823 until his death. As bishop of Calcutta, all of India was his diocese. An admirer of the hymns of John Newton and William…

  • Psalms,  Service music

    Pentecost, commonly called Whitsunday

    A hymn for PentecostPropersPsalms from the Daily OfficeMotetsJohn Keble, “Whitsunday” “Come down, O love divine” In 1367 Bianco da Siena entered the Order of Jesuates, a community of unordained men who followed the rule of St. Augustine. They were known for their fervent and mystical piety, which is reflected in the hymns of its most famous member. In 1851, 92 of these were published, four of which have been translated into English. “Come down, O Love divine” is the most famous of these. It was encluded in the first edition of the English Hymnal (1906) with four stanzas, one of which is omited in our Hymnal. The tune DOWN AMPNEY…