• Hymns,  Service music

    Sunday after Ascension (May 24, 2020)

    If we were together this morning, our processional hymn would probably be Charles Wesley’s triumphant “Hail the day that sees him rise.” Since we’re not together, as part of our continuing Choir-in-Quarantine series, we’ve recorded this hymn from our individual spaces (you can sing along at #104, second tune). Wesley’s original poem (first published in 1739) contained ten stanzas (our Hymnal includes four of these, with some alterations). The hymn affirms Christ’s kingly rule (he is seated at the right hand of the Father to rule, not to relax), his continued full humanity (his human hands still bear the scars of his crucifixion), and our destiny to behold him face…

  • Service music

    Ascension Day

    On this page PropersPsalms from the Daily OfficeMotets and cantatasJohn Keble, “Ascension Day” Propers      Introit Viri Galilaei. Acts 1Ye men of Galilee, why stand ye gazing up into heaven? Alleluia : in like manner as ye have seen him going up into heaven, so shall he come again. Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia. [Psalm 47] O clap your hands together, all ye people: O sing unto God with the voice of melody. Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Ghost. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be: world without end. Amen. Ye men of Galilee . . .  …

  • Service music

    Sunday after Ascension (“Exaudi”)

    PropersPsalms from the Daily OfficeMotets and cantatasJohn Keble, “Sunday after Ascension” Propers      Introit Exaudi, Domine. Psalm 27Consider, O Lord, and hear me, when I cry unto thee, alleluia: unto thee my heart hath said, Thy face, Lord, have I sought; thy face, Lord, will I seek: O hide not thou thy face from thy servant, alleluia, alleluia. The Lord is my light, and my salvation: whom then shall I fear? Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Ghost. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be: world without end. Amen. Consider, O Lord . . .    …

  • Service music

    Canticles

    The word canticle from the Latin canticulum, a “little song.” As a technical liturgical term, it is used to designate one of the small body of texts that have been traditionally been used in the daily worship of the Church. Almost all of these texts are from Scriptures, and most from outside the Psalter. Venite exultemus Domino In the Book of Common Prayer, the first canticle appointed is the Venite exultemus Domino (often called simply the Venite): which begins “O come let us sing unto the Lord.” It is sung at the beginning of Morning Prayer, before the readings — or chanting — from the Psalter, the Old Testament, and…

  • Hymns,  Service music

    Rogation Sunday music

    Our singing hymns together has been suspended for some time. I hope that there is music in your homes. The choir recorded a hymn for Rogation Sunday (and the next three Rogation days), which you can listen to here. It is hymn #101, if you care to sing along. With Wallace’s help, we’ve also recorded one of the parish’s favorite Communion hymns: “Deck thyself my soul with gladness.” You listen to our quarantine-style recording right here. You may be interested in reading more about this hymn here, and reading the text to the 6 stanzas in the original that are missing from our Hymnal. Since we’ve been unable to take…

  • Service music

    Fifth Sunday after Easter (“Rogation Sunday”)

    On this page About this SundayA hymn for Rogation daysPropersPsalms from the Daily OfficeMotets and cantatas About this Sunday “Rogation” comes from the Latin rogare, which means to ask. AT the beginning of today’s Gospel, Jesus (in the Upper Room, the night before his death) says to the disciples: “Whatsoever ye shall ask the Father in my name, he will give it you. Hitherto have ye asked nothing in my name: ask, and ye shall receive, that your joy may be full.” Our Prayerbook designates Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday of this week as Rogation Days. The asking tied to these days for many centuries emphasized prayers for God’s favor to…

  • Service music

    Fourth Sunday after Easter (“Cantate”)

    On this page PropersPsalms from the Daily OfficeMotets and cantatas Propers      Introit Cantate Domino. Psalm 98O sing unto the Lord a new song, alleluia: for the Lord hath done marvelous things, alleluia: in the sight of the nations hath he shewed his righteous judgments, alleluia, alleluia, alleluia. With his own right hand, and with his holy arm: hath he gotten himself the victory. Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Ghost. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be: world without end. Amen. O sing unto the Lord . . . Men of the choir of All Saints…

  • Service music

    Music in our liturgy

    Below are several pages that guide readers to historical background, commentary, recordings, and links to other resources concerning aspects of our liturgical life together. Psalms Hymns Canticles Music through the Church Year COMING SOON: The Ordinary of the Mass

  • Hymns,  Service music

    More music from quarantine

    During Lent, our Eucharistic service does not include the singing of the Gloria. This means that it has been a long time (February 23rd) since we have been able to sing one of the most ancient and joyous portions of our liturgy. So our choir has made a recording (each recording in our discrete spaces) of the Scottish Chant setting of the Gloria (p. 739 in the Hymnal) to aid in your singing together at home. We have also made a new recording of one of the favorite hymns in our parish, “The King of Love my Shepherd is.” The sixth stanza features a stirring descant that our sopranos can’t…